Tuesday, December 09, 2008

You've Come A Long Way Baby



We graphed a third degree polynomial equation today. We used minimum and maximum points. We used concavity and inflection points. When we finished, we compared our results to the results on the graphing calculator. The kids were amazed at how accurate our picture was. The teacher who entered the room as my class was ending was impressed.

I told the class to remember when graphing straight lines was a challenge. One boy took the picture above. They've come a long way, baby!

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

I don't mean to sound like a dunce... but what use does that have in the real world? Why do kids need to learn that?

Pissed Off said...

There is nothing wrong with learning for learnings sake. How do we know what we are interested in if we are not exposed to everything?

Besides, to be a well rounded person it is nice to knwo something about everything. I hated Shakespeare but I am glad I was exposed to his writings in HS. Shakespeare has nothing to do with the real world either.

Schoolgal said...

Anon:
There is a TV show called Numbers.
And of course, much of what is in the world today comes from math and science.

btw, did you hear about Randi wanting Hillary's senate seat??
I am sick over this. Caroline is extremely intelligent without being pandering. I don't even care she worked with Bloomie. I am sure this is payback for Ted backing Obama.

Anonymous said...

Schoolgal:
There is a TV show called Numbers.
And of course, much of what is in the world today comes from math and science.


And linking what students learn in school to the outside world is critical in students gaining a deeper understanding of the material.

We teach Shakespeare because
" Shakespeare's characters, stories and themes have been, and still are, a source of meaning and significance for every generation. Their relevance lies in the virtually endless opportunities they offer for reinterpretation and local application of familiar human relationships and passions. The plays are peopled with fathers, mothers, sons, daughters, wives, husbands, brothers and sisters." ( I can't claim that as my own. )

Pissed Off said...

I never liked Shakespeare and still don't see the value, sorry. But, I would feel cheated if some English teachers never made me read those works.

Pink Floyd said...

I think PO'd is right. If I had never taken calculus and some of the other classes in Packemin, I would've never went on to be an Electrical Engineering major. And we do stuff like this all the time, and more!

Anonymous said...

Again, I agree with POd...Shakespeare is useless in the real world. But I personally enjoy reading his work. (Which I was exposed to in school, and is why we teach it to kids)

I'm sorry but Anonymous's quote is rather funny to me...(see above)...

My students aren't worried about the "meaning and significance" for their generation! Are you kidding me???? They're worried about real world issues of importance to them.

Ms. Scarlett

Anonymous said...

This is exactly my point:
I would've never went on to be an Electrical Engineering major. And we do stuff like this all the time, and more!

If you taught math like that you should show the relevance it has in the real world, - the way an electrical engineer might use it.

Mister Teacher said...

What use does knowing the "dangling participle" have in the real world? Who really cares how a bill becomes a law??

And I haven't watched the TV show Numbers in quite a while, but I do remember they applied math to everything. "Oh no, terrorists are attacking the local Taco Bell! Let's apply Chalupa Maximization Theory and discover their next move!"

See, math has plenty of uses.