Friday, December 30, 2011

Criminal


Sam Eshaghoff, the man who took SATs for Great Neck Students, will be featured on 60 Minutes and that, in my opinion, is almost as criminal as his deed.  I can't believe this guy will be given national exposure and a chance to justify this behavior.

Eshaghoff has the audacity to claim he gave poor students their lives back.  He claims that students with poor grades in high school will now be able to go on to college.  What he fails to mention is that students without background in high school do not succeed in college either.  The despicable act he has committed has not only hurt innocent students who have lost their place because of this, but  has hurt the ones he is claiming to have helped by putting them in a situation they can't possibly succeed in.

Eshaghoff lawyer claims he is a good hearted guy who just wanted to help others.  The lawyer claims this guy is now becoming the poster child for the cheating that has gone on, undetected for years.  What a sorry defense.  Let's hope the American public doesn't fall for it.

2 comments:

Sweet Girl Tracie said...

I am mostly disgusted with their parents.

1. It makes me wonder where the kids got the money to cheat. Thousands of dollars were used to pay the students who took the exams.
2. Why didnt the parents question and look into things more?
3. I find it extremely shady that these kids were able to get the money for this SAT scam.

Anonymous said...

I think you may not realize how much money is floating around in Great Neck, and that, in many cases, the parents were likely compliant (especially among certain "groups"). They easily pay that much for SAT and college entrance coaching, which is quite a different thing than SAT prep courses. Just do a bit of googling with terms like "college admissions assistance" and the like. A friend who lives elsewhere on Long Island told me that the parents of many of her kid's friends pay hundreds of dollars per session for one-on-one SAT help, as well as individual assistance to get into specific schools.