Tuesday, June 17, 2008

Waiting For The Punchline


The new math regents in integrated algebra was given today. The test is worth 89 points and we won't know the conversion until the end of June. We have a pool going as to what the passing grade will be. I picked 27 but that was gone by the time I found out about the pool. Twenty six was also gone. I ended up choosing 29. One teacher decided not to bet because the numbers 26 - 30 were already picked. I can't wait to see what the Board of Regents will come up with for this one.

6 comments:

17 (really 15) more years said...

Our math teacher doesn't even know that the conversion chart won't be posted til June 26th. She told the kids they're getting their grades tomorrow -and I had no problem pointing out her error to them.

How was the test as far as difficulty?

algebra teacher in the brons said...

the test was ridiculous. parts II-IV were way too hard and the rubric way to stringent to be fair, in my opinion. there was almost nothing computational on the test at all! and i truly pity any poor ELLs who tried to take the exam.

i think the algebra curriculum is far too broad to be effectively covered in a year, with a ton of things that are unrelated to each other.

i can't believe relative error was a 4 pt question!!!

Pissed Off said...

I agree with you brons. The test gave too few points for so much work.

17 (really 15) more years said...

Saw my kids' raw scores today- they are hard working, but most are very average 8th graders. I saw raw scores as high as 83 points, with most being in the 74-78 range.

I hate to say it, but I smell something rotten in the state of Denmark....

Pissed Off said...

Our scores were much lower and my school is a very good one. I only saw a few in the 70's. I agree, something is rotten in your school.

Anonymous said...

The test looked more like a college freshman algebra course exam, and was far more analytical than anything I learned years ago in ninth grade algebra. The Algebra regent exams must have been written in a vacuum by someone who knows nothing about how children learn, as usual.